Area Guide to Paris, Missouri, USA

Home Up

Home
Paris Area Lodging
City Sights
Monroe County Museum
Union Covered Bridge
Mark Twain Country Club
Monroe Co. Swim Club
Mark Twain Lake
Mark Twain State Park
Mark Twain Old Threshers
Monroe County Fair


Paris Historic Sites and Structures

Buildings Monroe County Courthouse   Male Academy   Opera House Site
Female Seminary Site   Caretaker's Building   First Baptist Church
First Christian Church   Presbyterian Church   First Methodist Church
Paris Public Library   
Homes Glenn House Site   Broughton House   Meier House Site   Clay Mallory Home
R.O. Osborn Home/Grime House   Robert M. Burgess House   Flanders House Site
Effie Ashcraft Home Site   Buerk Home   Baxter Vaughn Home   Pioneer Home
Judge D.H. Moss Home   Brace Home   Thomas Conyer House   Buckner Home
Allen Home   W.B. Priest Home
Places Three-section Tombstone   Fox Street   Main Street
Structures Paris Covered Bridge Site   Union Covered Bridge
Museums Mark Twain State Park Shrine   Monroe County Museum
Things Clemens Family Mural   Rockwell Visit   Bicentennial Tree   California Redwood Tree

Back to Top

No. 0 The Monroe County Courthouse   address
     Marker to Josephus Fox, Founder of Paris, Historical Museum, Historical Mural, John F. Kennedy Memorial, the courthouse building.
     It was constructed in 1912 of limestone, marble, and granite at a cost of $100,000 and in May, 1913, was ready for furniture.  Built on site of original courthouse, it was the last domed courthouse built in Missouri.
     In the West Lobby is the John Fitzgerald Kennedy Memorial plaque.  On it is a quotation from his inaugural address: "My fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country."
     In the lobby the Monroe County Historical Society has several items on display in its Historical Museum including relics of early days and paintings by Gordon Snidow, notable Cowboy artist, born in Paris.  The Museum is located on the first floor of the courthouse.  Admission is free.
     In the rotunda are four murals painted by Mrs. Doris Hill of Paris, each illustrating a 50-year period of the 200 years.  The Great Seal of Missouri is featured in mosaic  tile on the floor.
     A marker to the founder of Paris stands in the west front yard.  It was dedicated in 1931 when the county observed its 100th anniversary.  It was erected in memory of Ezra Fox, first white settler in Monroe County, born in Virginia in 1773, moved to Monroe County in 1819, died at Middle Grove in 1853; and to his son Josephus Fox, founder of Paris.
     The Veterans Memorial on the northwest courthouse lawn was dedicated in 1991.
     For more information, visit the Monroe County Courthouse page under Monroe County.

Back to Top
 

Courthouse.jpg (492875 bytes)

Courthouse1961.jpg (423330 bytes)
1960s circa Post Card compliments Homer Branham, Kansas City, MO

No. 1 Site of the Glenn House   address
     Built before the civil War, it was headquarters for soldiers during the war as well as the Center for many social events for three quarters of a Century.  Built in 1855 it had three stories of red brick with exterior walls of 14 inch solid brick and interior dividing walls of 9 inch solid brick, there were 31 rooms.  All of the hotel facilities were on the send and third floors.  There was at one time a drug store, a cafe and a cigar factory and other businesses on the second floor.  The name was changed to the Jefferson hotel by John S. Pool.  In 1921 it was bought by A. W. Benson & Son who operated it until Oct. 1968.  Sold to Mr. & Mrs. Carl Mongler about 1969.  In 1972 it was sold to the Savings Bank.  Torn down in 1974 and the new bank built.

Back to Top
 

Jefferson Hotel Photos

past & present

No. 2 Broughton House   313 E. Madison St.
    
Probably the oldest building in Paris.  The abstract shows that in 1831 J. C. Fox bought the land and built the house.  Believed to be the original church building of the Baptist Congregation.  It remained the property of the Baptists until after the Civil Ware in 1865 and Ben and Thomas Broughton purchased it.  The house is be restored by its present Mr. and Mrs. Keaton Wheelan.

Back to Top
 

Broughton House Photos

past & present

No. 3 Site of the Paris Covered Bridge   address
    
The Covered Bridge was built in 1857 over Middle Fork of Salt River.  The builders were Joseph C. Elliot and son William B. Elliot.  The bridge was a narrow Burr Arch structure, 100 feet long.  It was restored in June 1952 by Roy Power and a strict weight and vehicle restriction was placed on it.  In August 1958 the bridge was swept away by flood waters.  Present bridge rests partly on stone foundation of the old bridge.  Remains of the bridge exist downstream along the banks of the river.
     For more photos of the Paris Covered Bridge, visit Photo Gallery 5.

Back to Top
 

OldCoveredBridgePC.jpg (59136 bytes)
Post Card compliments Homer Branham,
Kansas City, MO
No. 4 Three-Section Tombstone   Founder's Cemetery, north edge of Paris
    
Listed in Ripley's "Believe It Or Not".  Possibly only one in the world to list three wives of one husband.

     For the three wives of Daniel Dulany.

Jacintha D. Dulany
Born Feb.22, 1822
Married Jan. 12, 1841
Died Dec. 24, 1842

Ann E. Dulany
Born Sept. 6, 1825
Married Jan. 8, 1851
Died Jan. 4, 1853

Mary A. Dulany
Born Feb. 1, 1822
Married April 14, 1845
Died Dec. 13, 1845

One inscription at base of stone for all three.

Visit the Founders Cemetery Page for more information.

Back to Top
 

founderscem1.jpg (78590 bytes)

founderscem2.jpg (76182 bytes)

No. 5 Fox Street   address
    The first street in Paris in 1831 when the site of Paris was selected.  Founder was Josephus fox, son of Ezra Fox.

Back to Top
 

Fox St. Photos

past & present

No. 6 Site of the old Meier House   address
    
The Meier House was built before the Civil Ware time.  It was estimated there were around 50,000 bricks in the house.  The house walls were solid brick, three bricks thick.  It was owned by Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Meier, then by a daughter, then a grandson, Russell Brooks.  The old house was torn down in 1969.  Now a mobile home lot.

Back to Top
 

Meier House Photos

past & present

No. 7 The Clay Mallory Home   318 W. Marion St.
    
No exact date on when it was built but is probably the oldest building in Paris.  The abstract shows that in 1831, J. Cephus Fox bought the land and built the house.  Owned by Clay Mallory.

Back to Top
 

Clay Mallory Home Photos

past & present

No. 8 The R. O. Osborn's Home or Grimes House   330 W. Monroe St.
    
Built in 1889 on the Queen Anne style, two and one half stories high, a circular veranda on three sides of the house.  Tradition is that it was the first or one of the first homes to have a bath tub.  The bathtub was of copper with a wooden frame around it.  Owned by Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Hultz.

Back to Top
 

Osborn/Grimes Home Photos

past & present

 

No. 9 The Robert M. Burgess House   319 W. Monroe St.
    
Built in 1860, a French mansard style containing eight rooms of solid brick construction, has huge hand cut stones for a foundation.  Exterior plans are said to have been used in part fot the Governor's Mansion in Jefferson City.  Mr. Burgess first settled on a farm near Goss.  He was a buyer and a shipper of livestock.  Owned by Mr. and Mrs. Tim Burnett, Jr.

Back to Top
 

Burgess House Photos

past & present

No.10 Site of Flanders House   address
     Built in 1831, possibly one of the first homes built in Paris.  It was made of brick and wood.  It was also the home of the first county court of Monroe County and the building in which the First Christian Church was organized in 1832.  The old house had 14 inch solid brick outside walls, with solid brick division walls between rooms and was one and one half stories high with six rooms.  On the west area of the grounds an ice house was built underground.  Torn down and Senior Citizen apartments built on site.

Back to Top
 

Flanders House Photos

past & present

 

No.11 Site of Effie Ashcraft Home   address
     Built before 1859, the house was a log structure house on East Caldwell.  In 1974 and 1975 the house sold to the Monroe County Historical Society.  The building was torn down and the logs are to be used by the society to build a one room log house to use for display and other purposes.

Back to Top
 

Effie Ashcraft Home Photos

past & present

 

No.12 The Male Academy   East Monroe St.
     Built in 1850 located on Monroe Street north of the fairgrounds.  There are 13 rooms and one of the back rooms has an inside well.  There was space for 30 boarders.  There is an old cemetery located west of the house, where persons who died during a smallpox epidemic in the 1850's were buried.  Property now owned by Mr. and Mrs. Russell Herron.  It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Back to Top
 

No.13 The Old Buerk Home   201 E. Caldwell St.
     Built in the late 1850's or early 1860's by Thomas and Christian Buerk.  The Buerk brothers were from Germany.  Thomas Buerk was generally supposed to have been the wealthiest man in Paris.  Owned by Mr. and Mrs. Lyle Popkes. 

Back to Top
 

buerkhouse.jpg (40818 bytes)

 

No.14 Site of the Opera House   address
     Built in 1888and 1889.  now the site of the Paris National Bank.  It was two stories high, the lower rooms were used by stores and the upper rooms for public meetings and entertainment.  It was lighted by gas.  Torn down and present National Bank built on lot. 

Back to Top
 

Opera House Photos

past & present

 

No.15 The Baxter Vaughn Home   117 East Locust St.
     Built by James McVey before 1865.  Mrs. McVey's wife was Mary McBride, Daughter of Ebenezer McBride, who owned the first sewing machine in this area.  Her sister Bina made her wedding dress when she married William Woods.  He was the founder of William Woods College at Fulton, Missouri.  Owned by Mrs. Nell Sebastian.

Back to Top
 

Baxter Vaughn Home Photos

past & present

 

No.16 The Pioneer Home   208 W. Locust St.
     Building time not known.  It is brick and each room has its own brick footing, the division walls extend to the ground.  The old abstract shows this land was first issued to Hightower T. Hackney on April 19, 1830, the year before Paris was founded.  Now owned by Mrs. Velma Stalcup. 

Back to Top
 

Pioneer Home Photos

past & present

 

No.17 The Judge D. H. Moss Home   403 W. Locust St.
     Built in 1884 in the Queen Anne Style, it was one of the handsomest and most complete residences in Northeast Missouri.  The fine dental and cresting work on the top of the roof is quite ornamental.  Some of the windows have French plate glass and are square with handsome lintel work and cove cornices.  The home contains 11 large rooms, ranging in size from 14 by 15 to 18 by 16 feet.  Now owned by Mr. and Mrs. Charles Shatzer. 

Back to Top
 

Judge D. H. Moss Home Photos

past & present

No.18 Site of the Female Seminary   West Locust Street
     Built in the 1850's, was located on West Locust Street where the homes of Mrs. Howard Harris and Miss Helen McKamey now stand.  Alfred Wilson deeded the two lots to the City.  It was still in session in 1867.  Material from old building used in present Harris house. 

Back to Top
 

Female Seminary Photos

past & present

No.19 The Brace Home   West end of Locust Street and turn left go mile (Rock Road)
     Built in 1850 the house was owned by Judge Theodore Brace,  admitted to the bar at age 22, elected Colonel of the first regiment of Monroe County.  In 1874 was elected to the State Senate and probate judge of Monroe County in 1878, and a Circuit judge in 1880.  There are two large front rooms with hall between, each room has a fireplace, two back rooms are built as an ell on the west front room, with a veranda on the east and south sides of these rooms.  They originally had 11 foot ceilings.  There is a large curved oak stairway to the second floor four bedrooms.  Mr. and Mrs. Elwood Raines purchased the home in 1957. 

Back to Top
 

Brace Home  Photos

past & present

No.20 The Thomas Conyers House   122 Payne St.
     Built in 1845 by Thomas Conyers, a major in the Black Hawk War, who operated a grocery store in a building on the present site of the Monroe County Abstract building.  The original house has rafters of saplings, with one side only hewed flat to hold roof sheathing, the rest of the saplings still carrying the original bark.  Three of the original soft pine, wide board floors are in use.  Original fireplace still used in living room.  Interior walls of solid brick, each with its own foundation.  North part added in 1905 has eight heavy curved glass windows on northwest corner.  Owned at on time by Mrs. and Mrs. R. I. "Si" Colborn.  Mr. and Jack Nichols are the present owners.

Back to Top
 

Thomas Conyer's  House  Photos

past & present

No.21 The Old Buckner Home   526 South Main St.
     Built in 1871 by William Fitzhugh Buckner.  Mr. Buckner died in 1929 at the age of 101 years.  Mr. Buckner's eighty years of membership was the longest number of years in any Masonic Lodge in the United States.  He was also the last surviving Veteran of the Mexican War.  The original house contained eight rooms, a cellar, a large front veranda, large front and back halls, rooms were 16 by 16 feet.  Around 1900 a bath and a room were added and a basement dug under the middle of the house for a furnace.  Mr. and Mrs. Carl Bounds purchased the home in 1945. 

Back to Top
 

Buckner Home   Photos

past & present

 

No.22 The Allen Home   South edge of Paris on Highway 15
     Built in 1869 by the grandfather of Dr. George M. Ragsdale, prominent Paris physician.  The ground floor contains five large rooms.  The baseboards are hand grained, with a walnut curved stairway, spindles and newel post, with four bedrooms upstairs.  The front portico floor and steps were made of hand hewn rocks, as well as the foundation and the bottom window casings.  Anne  Carman is the present owner

Back to Top
 

Allen Home   Photos

past & present

 

No.23 The W. B. Priest Family Home   West of Paris on Business  Highway 24.
     It was built prior to the Civil War.  Of brick construction, its outer walls are solid, as well as the inner division walls.  The porch has been restored.

Back to Top

W. B. Priest Family Home  Photos

past & present

 

No.24 Caretaker's Building   Walnut Grove Cemetery north of Paris on Highway 15
     The original building's design is Little Dixie Victorian architecture constructed around 1870.  The round turret originally enclosed a water tower for storage of water.  A directory has been placed at the entrance of the cemetery.
     For a Walnut Grove Cemetery directory, visit the Walnut Grove Cemetery pages.

Back to Top

cemeterybldg.jpg (6156 bytes)
Caretaker's Building Photos

past & present

No.25 Union Covered Bridge   Highway 24 west then south on Route C
     The only "Burr-arch" covered bridge left in Missouri is located near Paris.  Named for the Union Church which once stood nearby.  this 125 foot-long, 17 foot-wide bridge was built in 1871 by Joseph C. Elliott for $5,000.
     Visit the ParisMO.net Union Covered Bridge page for more information.
     For more photos of Union Covered Bridge, visit Photo Gallery 5.

Back to Top
 

unionbridge.jpg (27592 bytes)
Union Covered  Bridge Photos
unionbridge1.jpg (7164 bytes)
No.26 The First Baptist Church   North Main St.
     Built in 1917, it is red brick with a Greek porch.
     For more information on the First Baptist Church, visit our Churches page.

Back to Top
 

First Baptist Church Photos

past & present

 

No.27 The First Christian Church   Corner of Caldwell & Washington Streets
     Built in 1910, the gray brick structure is English Gothic Type.  The bell that hands in the church hung in the steeple of the church in 1848.
     For more information on the First Christian Church, visit our Churches page.

Back to Top
 

First Christian  Church Photos

past & present

 

No.28 The Presbyterian Church   West Caldwell St.
     Built in 1920 of red brick and features a Greek porch.
          For more information on the Presbyterian Church, visit our Churches page.

Back to Top
 

presbyterianchurchold.jpg (40403 bytes)

No.29 The First Methodist Church   207 W. Caldwell
     For more information on the First Methodist Church, visit our Churches page.

Back to Top
 

methodistchurchold2.jpg (60601 bytes)
No.30 Paris Public Library   101 N. Main St.
     Built in 1917, it is red brick with a Greek porch.
     For more information, visit the Dulany Library page.

Back to Top
 

Library.jpg (508311 bytes)
No.31 Main Street   Main Street
     

StoreFrontsNorth.jpg (469265 bytes)     StoreFrontsSouth.jpg (490479 bytes)

Back to Top

downtownParisold.jpg (34562 bytes)


1950s circa Post Card compliments Homer Branham, Kansas City, MO

No.32 Mark Twain State Park/Shrine    Located at Florida, 10 mi. east of Paris at Highway 107 and Route U intersection
     The quarter-of-a-century old museum is a tribute to Samuel Clemens, who was born in the county and in later years used many of his childhood friends from the county in his books.  Along with Twain's original birthplace, the Shrine possesses the author's invaluable handwritten manuscript of Tom Sawyer".
     Visit the ParisMO.net Mark Twain State Park & Mark Twain Shrine pages.

Back to Top

 

buzzroost.jpg (26257 bytes)

mtmuseum.jpg (3679 bytes)

marktwainhouse.jpg (41352 bytes)

No.33 Clemens Family Mural    Paris Post Office. W. Monroe St.
     It has hung in the lobby since 1940 and depicts the arrival at Florida in Monroe County, of the Clemens family before Mark Twain: was born.  Fred G. Carpenter, artist. 

Back to Top

 

Clemens Family Mural Photo

 

No.34 Rockwell Visit    Monroe County Appeal Office, 230 N. Main St. (Open M-F 8-5)
     A reproduction of the Norman Rockwell painting "A Country Editor" completed in 1946, can be seen in the office of the Monroe County APPEAL at Paris.  Rockwell came to Paris and used the APPEAL's editor, the late Jack Blanton, and other employees as his models.
     In April, 1945, Norman Rockwell came to Paris and spent three days sketching and photographing the daily routine of the Monroe County APPEAL.
     In the May 25, 1946, issue of the Saturday Evening Post, the full-color finished picture appeared along with an article about the "country editor," Jack Blanton.
     The original painting now hangs in the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.
     Rockwell couldn't resist painting himself into the activity.  He is seen coming through the door, pipe clenched, sketch paper under his arm.
     Shown standing to the right of the counter, talking to Mr. and Mrs. Ed Wood (Fernelle's parents), is city editor and reporter, Malcolm Higgins.
     Rockwell's visit came during the week following President Franklin Roosevelt's death on April 12, 1945.  The man in the chair is reading the account of the president's death.  The pictures on the front page are of Roosevelt and his successor, Harry S. Truman.
     Jack Blanton is depicted at the old manual typewriter he used to bang out editorials for which he was well known.  Looking over his shoulder is Paul Nipps, the Appeal's printer.
     Dickie Wyatt, the printer's devil is dashing past secretary Fernelle (Blondie) Wood White.
     On the back wall above the desk is a picture of Blanton's father, B.F. Blanton, the founder of the Appeal.  The gold-star service flag hands beneath a picture of Blanton's grandson, also named Jack, who lost his life in the Army Air Forces during World War II.
     While Rockwell did not paint in Paris, his detailed sketches and the over 100 photographs enabled him to recreate such minor details as the broken venetian bland and the missing light bulbs.
     A total of nine paints and sketches were published in a four page feature by the Saturday Evening Post.

Back to Top

 

"A Country Editor"

CountryEditormd.jpg (50044 bytes)
10"x 5"
printable image
for 8" x 11" paper (77kb)
No.35 Bicentennial Tree    710 Cleveland St.
     The Pin Oak Tree is over 300 years old. 

Back to Top

 

Bicentennial Tree  Photos

  past & present

 

No.36 California Redwood Tree    460 W. Monroe St.
     It was brought by covered wagon from California in 1832. 

Back to Top

 

redwood.jpg (45879 bytes)

Prepared by the Paris Bicentennial Committee
& Paris Area Chamber of Commerce

Back to Top

Revised  Tuesday, May 08, 2007   Visitor Hit Counter